Difference between revisions of "Democratic Kampuchea"

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(Created page with "Pol Pot can hardly be called a socialist, especially in practice. His ideology and actions appeared to be more so ethno-nationalist and primitivist, evidenced by his extreme x...")
 
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==Supposed Socialism==
 
Pol Pot can hardly be called a socialist, especially in practice. His ideology and actions appeared to be more so ethno-nationalist and primitivist, evidenced by his extreme xenophobia of ethnic minorities such as the Chinese, Vietnamese, Lao, and Cham,<ref>Helen Fein. Revolutionary and Antirevolutionary Genocides: A Comparison of State Murders in Democratic Kampuchea, 1975 to 1979, and in Indonesia, 1965 to 1966. ''Comparative Studies in Society and History'', Vol. 35, No. 4 (Oct. 1993), pp. 796–823</ref> on top of his de-industrialization and mass-murder of intellectuals, beyond what may be considered reasonable grounds, such as if those intellectuals had supported a counter-revolution to his supposed socialist government. Pol Pot considered the intelligentsia contaminated with Western knowledge, and thus enemies merely for this. In the end, it was a more authentic socialist state, Vietnam, that ended his murderous and reactionary regime and brought upon a more true course for socialism, in the successor state of the People’s Republic of Kampuchea. Pol Pot’s ideology perhaps resembles fascism more than socialism, if anything, as he for instance believed in the importance of racial struggle<ref>{{cite book|title=Revolution and its Aftermath|editor=David Chandler & Ben Kiernan|location=New Haven|year=1983}}</ref> and “living space” more than things like class-based struggle and such.
 
Pol Pot can hardly be called a socialist, especially in practice. His ideology and actions appeared to be more so ethno-nationalist and primitivist, evidenced by his extreme xenophobia of ethnic minorities such as the Chinese, Vietnamese, Lao, and Cham,<ref>Helen Fein. Revolutionary and Antirevolutionary Genocides: A Comparison of State Murders in Democratic Kampuchea, 1975 to 1979, and in Indonesia, 1965 to 1966. ''Comparative Studies in Society and History'', Vol. 35, No. 4 (Oct. 1993), pp. 796–823</ref> on top of his de-industrialization and mass-murder of intellectuals, beyond what may be considered reasonable grounds, such as if those intellectuals had supported a counter-revolution to his supposed socialist government. Pol Pot considered the intelligentsia contaminated with Western knowledge, and thus enemies merely for this. In the end, it was a more authentic socialist state, Vietnam, that ended his murderous and reactionary regime and brought upon a more true course for socialism, in the successor state of the People’s Republic of Kampuchea. Pol Pot’s ideology perhaps resembles fascism more than socialism, if anything, as he for instance believed in the importance of racial struggle<ref>{{cite book|title=Revolution and its Aftermath|editor=David Chandler & Ben Kiernan|location=New Haven|year=1983}}</ref> and “living space” more than things like class-based struggle and such.
  
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==Collaboration with the United States==
 
Pol Pot served more as a force against the socialist world, as he was backed by the CIA and China<ref>Jackson, Karl D. Cambodia 1977: gone to Pot – ''Asian Survey'', 1978. p. 81</ref>, which teamed up with the United States to oppose the Soviet Union, which had supported Vietnam – which Pol Pot was against. The United States further sponsored the creation and military operations of the Coalition Government of Democratic Kampuchea, which included the Khmer Rouge, which itself officially renounced communism in 1981 following the Cambodian-Vietnamese War, turning for support from the United States then.
 
Pol Pot served more as a force against the socialist world, as he was backed by the CIA and China<ref>Jackson, Karl D. Cambodia 1977: gone to Pot – ''Asian Survey'', 1978. p. 81</ref>, which teamed up with the United States to oppose the Soviet Union, which had supported Vietnam – which Pol Pot was against. The United States further sponsored the creation and military operations of the Coalition Government of Democratic Kampuchea, which included the Khmer Rouge, which itself officially renounced communism in 1981 following the Cambodian-Vietnamese War, turning for support from the United States then.
  
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==Monarchy==
 
Pol Pot favored the reactionary monarchy and had good relations with them, and rather than seizing and developing the means of production, he had them destroyed as he deemed them to be of “the old ways.” He also pushed for de-urbanization of the country and effectively its ultimate de-industrialization. Religion was suppressed by excessive levels of force, and Pol Pot also pushed far too quickly to abolish money, despite the rest of the world not facilitating such a measure<ref>''Final Solutions: Mass Killing and Genocide in the Twentieth Century'' Cornell University Press, 2004. {{ISBN|0-8014-3965-5}} [https://books.google.com/books?id=LQfeXVU_EvgC&pg=PA133&dq=khmer+rouge+abolish+private+property+emptied+cities&hl=en&ei=J54_TIKyKIL88Abch92ICw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=9&ved=0CFAQ6AEwCA#v=onepage&q&f=false p. 127] https://web.archive.org/web/20160504104107/https://books.google.com/books?id=LQfeXVU_EvgC&pg=PA133&dq=khmer+rouge+abolish+private+property+emptied+cities&hl=en&ei=J54_TIKyKIL88Abch92ICw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=9&ved=0CFAQ6AEwCA#v=onepage&q&f=false</ref>. Children of those considered irredeemable were killed as well, to preempt any revenge, which was excessive as well.
 
Pol Pot favored the reactionary monarchy and had good relations with them, and rather than seizing and developing the means of production, he had them destroyed as he deemed them to be of “the old ways.” He also pushed for de-urbanization of the country and effectively its ultimate de-industrialization. Religion was suppressed by excessive levels of force, and Pol Pot also pushed far too quickly to abolish money, despite the rest of the world not facilitating such a measure<ref>''Final Solutions: Mass Killing and Genocide in the Twentieth Century'' Cornell University Press, 2004. {{ISBN|0-8014-3965-5}} [https://books.google.com/books?id=LQfeXVU_EvgC&pg=PA133&dq=khmer+rouge+abolish+private+property+emptied+cities&hl=en&ei=J54_TIKyKIL88Abch92ICw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=9&ved=0CFAQ6AEwCA#v=onepage&q&f=false p. 127] https://web.archive.org/web/20160504104107/https://books.google.com/books?id=LQfeXVU_EvgC&pg=PA133&dq=khmer+rouge+abolish+private+property+emptied+cities&hl=en&ei=J54_TIKyKIL88Abch92ICw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=9&ved=0CFAQ6AEwCA#v=onepage&q&f=false</ref>. Children of those considered irredeemable were killed as well, to preempt any revenge, which was excessive as well.
  
People with glasses were targeted, since primarily only the elite could afford them, on top of needing them for intellectual work, however merely having glasses was not a death sentence. Generally the same applies for other factors, such as being educated or knowing another language.<ref>[https://archive.is/3lzXz Did the Khmer Rouge really kill everyone with glasses?]</ref>
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==Primitivism==
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People with glasses were targeted, since primarily only the intelligentsia could afford them, on top of needing them for intellectual work, however merely having glasses was not a death sentence. Generally the same applies for other factors, such as being educated or knowing another language.<ref>[https://archive.is/3lzXz Did the Khmer Rouge really kill everyone with glasses?]</ref>
  
 
==References==
 
==References==

Revision as of 14:36, 31 July 2020

Supposed Socialism

Pol Pot can hardly be called a socialist, especially in practice. His ideology and actions appeared to be more so ethno-nationalist and primitivist, evidenced by his extreme xenophobia of ethnic minorities such as the Chinese, Vietnamese, Lao, and Cham,[1] on top of his de-industrialization and mass-murder of intellectuals, beyond what may be considered reasonable grounds, such as if those intellectuals had supported a counter-revolution to his supposed socialist government. Pol Pot considered the intelligentsia contaminated with Western knowledge, and thus enemies merely for this. In the end, it was a more authentic socialist state, Vietnam, that ended his murderous and reactionary regime and brought upon a more true course for socialism, in the successor state of the People’s Republic of Kampuchea. Pol Pot’s ideology perhaps resembles fascism more than socialism, if anything, as he for instance believed in the importance of racial struggle[2] and “living space” more than things like class-based struggle and such.

Collaboration with the United States

Pol Pot served more as a force against the socialist world, as he was backed by the CIA and China[3], which teamed up with the United States to oppose the Soviet Union, which had supported Vietnam – which Pol Pot was against. The United States further sponsored the creation and military operations of the Coalition Government of Democratic Kampuchea, which included the Khmer Rouge, which itself officially renounced communism in 1981 following the Cambodian-Vietnamese War, turning for support from the United States then.

Monarchy

Pol Pot favored the reactionary monarchy and had good relations with them, and rather than seizing and developing the means of production, he had them destroyed as he deemed them to be of “the old ways.” He also pushed for de-urbanization of the country and effectively its ultimate de-industrialization. Religion was suppressed by excessive levels of force, and Pol Pot also pushed far too quickly to abolish money, despite the rest of the world not facilitating such a measure[4]. Children of those considered irredeemable were killed as well, to preempt any revenge, which was excessive as well.

Primitivism

People with glasses were targeted, since primarily only the intelligentsia could afford them, on top of needing them for intellectual work, however merely having glasses was not a death sentence. Generally the same applies for other factors, such as being educated or knowing another language.[5]

References

  1. Helen Fein. Revolutionary and Antirevolutionary Genocides: A Comparison of State Murders in Democratic Kampuchea, 1975 to 1979, and in Indonesia, 1965 to 1966. Comparative Studies in Society and History, Vol. 35, No. 4 (Oct. 1993), pp. 796–823
  2. David Chandler & Ben Kiernan, ed. (1983). Revolution and its Aftermath. New Haven. 
  3. Jackson, Karl D. Cambodia 1977: gone to Pot – Asian Survey, 1978. p. 81
  4. Final Solutions: Mass Killing and Genocide in the Twentieth Century Cornell University Press, 2004. ISBN 0-8014-3965-5 p. 127 https://web.archive.org/web/20160504104107/https://books.google.com/books?id=LQfeXVU_EvgC&pg=PA133&dq=khmer+rouge+abolish+private+property+emptied+cities&hl=en&ei=J54_TIKyKIL88Abch92ICw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=9&ved=0CFAQ6AEwCA#v=onepage&q&f=false
  5. Did the Khmer Rouge really kill everyone with glasses?